Organizations: focus on creating a great system, not finding great talent

People’s performance (in an organization) depends on the resources they have to work with, including help they get from colleagues, and the infrastructure that supports their work.

It is impossible for even the most talented people to do competent, let alone brilliant, work in a flawed system.

A well-designed system filled with ordinary — but well-trained — people can consistently achieve stunning performance levels.

Consider investment analysts: they are treated like stars, hired away at enormous salaries, and many achieve great media notoriety. Boris Groysberg found that after a company hires a star, bad things happen all around: “The star’s performance plunges, there is a sharp decline in the functioning of the group or team the person works with, and the company’s market value falls.” In particular, “46% of the research analysts did poorly in the year after they left one company for another … their performance plummeted by an average of about 20% and had not climbed back to the old levels even five years later.”

Why do so many companies still place so much emphasis on getting and keeping great people and so little on building and sustaining great systems? A big part of the answer is that Western countries glorify rugged individualism so much that we make cognitive errors. We give too much credit to individual heroes when organizations do things right and place too much blame on individual scapegoats when things do wrong.

Hard Facts by Jeffrey Pfeffer and Robert I. Sutton


A related blog: Myth: talent is completely fixed and predetermined at birth

One Response to “Organizations: focus on creating a great system, not finding great talent”

  1. Cognitive error: acting on only what is immediately seen « Diverse Thoughts Says:

    […] Diverse Thoughts « Organizations: focus on creating a great system, not finding great talent […]

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