Archive for the ‘top-down organizations’ Category

Consensus + Management Hierarchy = Poor Decision-Making

December 2, 2007

The idea that top-down organizations are oppressive and damaging, and that workers should be given more decision-making power is well-known to managers.

To involve as many employees as possible in the decision-making process, management forms lots of teams and committees, comprised of a variety of workers.

Thus, before a CEO makes any decision, the issue makes its way through each layer of management hierarchy. At each level the issue is vetted by a committee.

Each committee resolves the issue by reaching consensus (lowest common denominator).

As the issue bubbles up through the hierarchy the opinions and ideas become more and more watered-down.  By the time it reaches the CEO there is little innovation or diversity left.

Paradoxically, in trying to make the decision-making process as inclusive as possible, companies actually make top executives more — not less — insulated from the real opinions of the workers.

Layers of management, coupled with a “can’t we all get along” (consensus) attitude is a recipe for poor decision-making at the top.

— Extracted from The Wisdom of Crowds by James Suroweicki


Here is a related blog: Consensus versus Collective Decision-Making