Posts Tagged ‘exercise’

Here is the path to the Fountain of Youth

September 15, 2018

Constant change in both food intake and body stimuli is a key to the Fountain of Youth, I think. Intense, infrequent jolts to the body.

The body adapts shockingly fast. Jolt the body one day and the next day that jolt is far less effective. Everyday must be dramatically different from the last.

Here are the foods and body stimuli that I use to jolt my body.

Foods

  1. Blueberry sauce: get one of those large packages of frozen wild blueberries from Costco (I think it’s got about 10 cups of blueberries in it). Make a simple blueberry sauce with half the package and eat it over the course of a day. So, 5 cups of blueberries are consumed in one day. Wow! What a jolt of energy and mental focus that provides.
  2. Green drinks: get a bunch of greens (spinach, lettuce, arugula, etc.), put them in a blender with a bit of water, and make a green drink. Do this at breakfast, again at lunch, and again at dinner. Plant-based is awesome.
  3. Soup: steam a bunch of carrots, celery, and beets (or some other in-season vegetables) and then pulverize them into a soup. Consume at breakfast, lunch, and dinner.
  4. Fresh orange juice: squeeze 4 oranges to make a wonderful glass of fresh orange juice. Do this at breakfast, lunch, and dinner.
  5. 500 calorie day: eat just green salads all day; use fresh lemon and/or balsamic vinegar for seasoning.
  6. Supplements: I used to take supplements every day. What a mistake that was. Now I take a multi, omega 6, and B12 supplement just once a week to jolt my body.
  7. Caffeine: The benefits of caffeine (increased alertness and energy) accrue only on day one. The next day the benefits drop precipitously. So, caffeine (e.g., black tea, green tea, coffee) should be taken infrequently (once a week, or every other week).

Body Stimulus

  1. Donate blood: once a quarter donate blood to the Red Cross. The loss of blood forces the body to generate new blood, which is a massive stimulus to the body.
  2. Cold shower: take a cold shower and/or ice bath. Again, this is a massive stimulus to the body.
  3. Long walks: go for a long walk, at least 1 hour in duration.
  4. Leg exercise: the leg muscles are some of the largest muscles in the body; an intense stimulation of the legs will jolt the entire body (and mind). Among other things, I do a static leg press. I have gotten up to doing a 1700-pound static leg press (strongmen do over 3000 pounds). This is a huge jolt to my entire system.
  5. Stretching and foam rolling: an intense, infrequent session of stretching and foam rolling will jolt the body and mind.
  6. Deadlift: lifting heavy weights is a great stimulus of both the body and mind.

Stop stretching

January 14, 2018

I hear this advice all the time: Do stretching. Get flexible.

That is bad advice.

Your muscles are like springs. Kind of like the springs in your car. Do you want loose springs in your car? Of course not. You want firm springs.

When you bend down to pick up an object, you want tight hamstrings (ham-springs) to firmly move you back up to the standing position.

The back is not designed to bend or twist. It is designed to stop motion and hold your torso stiff. Stop doing crunches, sit-ups, bends, and twists. They will ultimately harm your back.

Reading, exercising, and life

October 30, 2017

I sometimes read some words and pronounce “I read it” even if I didn’t fully understand what I read. Sadly, the goal is to get through the words, with some minimal understanding. The goal is not to thoroughly understand it.

I sometimes do an exercise and pronounce “I did it” even if I didn’t fully feel the movement and the muscles that were used. Sadly, the goal is to get through the exercise, with some minimal sensory feeling. The goal is not to thoroughly feel the movement and the muscles.

The years are passing by quickly. I wonder if, unconsciously, my goal is to get through life, with some minimal awareness. I hope not.

The best exercise and the best diet

August 17, 2017

Question: What is the best exercise?

Answer: The one you’ll do. That is, the one containing movements that you enjoy doing and can sustain doing over the months and years.

Question: What is the best diet?

Answer: The one you’ll do. That is, the one containing foods that you enjoy eating and can sustain doing over the months and years.

Movement is the holy grail of health

August 13, 2017

Sitting is a disease. Movement is the holy grail of health.

Blood flow is the life force that heals our body and removes the waste. No juice cleanse or apple cider vinegar or lemon water will compensate for inactivity. You don’t need 50 different food items, from 12 different countries, or a rare plant or berry from some remote island or jungle. That’s just another example of our desire to find things that do the work for us, passively. Thinking that we can just eat a superfood and that will make up for inactivity, when we know that regular exercise and maintaining a healthy bodyfat level is the real key to long term health.

I take a brisk 10 minute walk after each meal. Research suggests this improves digestion and reduces blood sugars, much better than a single 30 minute walk daily. Science is telling us that consistency is more important than intensity, and frequency is more important than quantity. Getting up an walking around very hour is better than exercising once at the end of the day.

— Stan Efferding

This is an excellent video by Stan Efferding: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OqjPuhlfO5w&list=PL8JNg3nrHrLTyntHlHg9ng2RchpWGM5zs&index=21

The three pillars of health – diet, exercise, and environmental training

January 14, 2017

A few extracts from the (excellent) book: What Doesn’t Kill Us: How Freezing Water, Extreme Altitude, and Environmental Conditioning Will Renew Our Lost Evolutionary Strength by Scott Carney

For at least half a century the conventional wisdom about maintaining good physical health has rested on the twin pillars of diet and exercise. While those are no doubt vital, there’s an equally important, but completely ignored, third pillar – environmental training.

Once you arrive at high altitude, your body automatically produces more red blood cells to compensate for lower oxygen saturation. Move to an oppressively hot environment and your body will sweat out fewer salts over time and produce lower volumes of urine. Heat will also stimulate your cardiovascular system to become more efficient and increase evaporation and cooling. Yet no environmental extreme induces as many changes in human physiology as the cold does.

A plunge into ice-cold water not only triggers a number of processes to warm the body, but also tweaks insulin production, tightens the circulatory system, and heightens mental awareness. A person actually has to get uncomfortable and experience that frigid cold if they want to initiate those systems.

Despite all of our technology, our bodies are just not ready for a world so completely tamed by our desire for comfort. Without stimulation, the responses that were designed to fight environmental challenges don’t always lie dormant. Sometimes they turn inward and wreak havoc on our insides. An entire field of medical research on autoimmune diseases suggests they originate from fundamental disconnect between the outside world and an under stimulated biology.

Exercise induces a momentary reprieve from the past and future

September 11, 2016

“The iron (i.e., weightlifting) has saved my life, repeatedly” (Tom Platz, bodybuilder)

“Indian marathon runner enters a state of Samadhi (enlightenment) and continues running long after crossing the finish line.”

There is a moment during intense exercise where fatigue sets in and the mind can no longer race with thoughts about the past or future, and can only be in the present. At that moment of being totally in the present, you are in a state of enlightenment (spiritual bliss).

Relish every minute of every day

August 10, 2016

When I exercise I typically set a certain number of reps as a goal. I then perform the reps, always focusing on the goal. Sigh. What a missed opportunity…

Oftentimes we focus on the goal and pay little or no attention to the journey to get to the goal. This includes big goals, such as graduating from college or getting married, as well as little goals such as getting to the top of the stairs or in an exercise finishing the desired number of reps.

The problem is that most of the time is spent in the journey. So if we ignore the journey then we miss most of life.

From now on I will make the journey the objective. I will walk up the stairs and consider each step the objective. I will exercise and make each rep the objective. I will stand in line at a store and focus on my breath. I will relish each minute of each day.

Factors that determine how much of your brain you use

April 23, 2016

I don’t think there is a single solution for maximizing how much of your brain you use. I think it’s a combination of many factors (there are many ways to influence the brain). Here are the key factors (I think) that determine how much of your brain you use:

  1. Exercise: how much exercise? What type of exercise? Frequency of exercise? Variability of exercise? Heavy or light? Endurance or strength? Balancing/coordination? Flexibility? Hormone-stimulating exercises? Walking? Running?
  2. Rest: how much sleep? Naps?
  3. Mental stimulation: reading? Writing? Debate? Games/puzzles?
  4. Food: fresh foods? Cooked or raw? Meat or no meat? Carbs or no carbs? Nutrient-dense? Fasting?
  5. Supplements: caffeine? Supplements that promote the flow of blood to the brain (e.g., Gingko Biloba)? Green tea? Black tea?
  6. Nature: how much time spent in a park? Frequency?
  7. Stress: no stress? Moderate amounts of stress? Massage? Foam roller? Body work?
  8. Music: how much? Classical or other?
  9. Social: lots of socializing? Lots of friends? A few close friends?
  10. Positive attitude: how to keep positive and motivated? Laughter? Smiling?
  11. Goals: short-term goals? Long-term goals?

One thing that I am fairly sure of is this: the body and brain adapt quickly. A strategy that works today for stimulating the brain will likely not work next week or next month. Constant change is crucial. Also, it seems that each human is unique. What works for me may not work for you.

The plank exercise as meditation

April 19, 2016

Over the years I’ve tried to meditate: sit still, note any tension in my body and let go of the tension, observe my breath and adopt a steady, slow breathing pattern. But I quickly get bored with that and soon stop meditating.

Recently I’ve been doing the plank exercise. For the first couple weeks, all I could think about while doing the plank was how unpleasant and hard it is. But then I decided to shift my focus to my breathing and on mentally observing the pull of gravity on my body. Wow! What a fantastic change in perspective. Now I love doing the plank. I love watching my breath and mentally observing the pull of gravity on my body as I perform the exercise. The plank has become meditation for me!