Posts Tagged ‘flexibility’

My strategy for mastering the Olympic weightlifting lifts

January 6, 2019

My new goal is to master the Olympic lifts. In particular, I want to master the snatch. One Olympic weightlifting champion (Jerzy Gregorek) says, If you can snatch your body weight into your 80s, then you will have a wonderful life. Why does he say that? Because the snatch is one of the most complex movements. It requires these attributes: flexibility, speed, and strength. The nice thing is, once possessed, those attributes transfer over to all parts of one’s life.

Here is my step-by-step plan to master the Olympic lifts:

(1) Increase my flexibility. Jerzy Gregorek said it took him a year to gain the required flexibility. I am sure it will take me at least that long. Probably twice as long. That’s okay. I want a solid foundation. I’ve been working on improving my flexibility for about a month. I’ve made good progress, but still have a long way to go.

(2) Master the squat press. What’s a squat press? It is this: Do a squat. At the bottom of the squat, press the bar overhead. Then stand up.

(3) Hire an Olympic weightlifting coach to teach me the snatch. I don’t think the snatch can be safely learned on one’s own.

Stop stretching

January 14, 2018

I hear this advice all the time: Do stretching. Get flexible.

That is bad advice.

Your muscles are like springs. Kind of like the springs in your car. Do you want loose springs in your car? Of course not. You want firm springs.

When you bend down to pick up an object, you want tight hamstrings (ham-springs) to firmly move you back up to the standing position.

The back is not designed to bend or twist. It is designed to stop motion and hold your torso stiff. Stop doing crunches, sit-ups, bends, and twists. They will ultimately harm your back.

Walk up stairs flat-footed

January 7, 2017

When I was a child I was told to walk up stairs on the balls of my feet.

That was bad guidance.

As a consequence of that guidance my calf muscles have, over the years, shortened. Shortened calf muscles have caused all sorts of problems: difficult to stand erectly, difficult to squat properly, limited flexibility, and others.

So, what is the right way to walk up a flight of stairs? Answer: walk flat-footed. On each step your foot should be flat on the step.