Posts Tagged ‘health’

The length of your telomeres is the key marker for your health and longevity

November 19, 2017

The key marker for health and longevity is the length of your telomeres. A telomere blood test is infinitely more valuable than any other blood test for assessing your health and longevity. If the percentage of critically short telomeres is high, then the likelihood of a serious illness occurring increases exponentially. You can now get your telomeres tested through lifelength.com (https://lifelength.com/). For some fascinating info on telomeres and its relation to health and longevity, see this awesome YouTube video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V5tQ0z8VbSg

Beliefs are really valuable even if they are wrong

November 13, 2017

The placebo effect has repeatedly demonstrated the power of the mind. If you believe strongly in something, then the mind has the power to make it happen.

If you believe that a vitamin or an exercise will keep you young and healthy, then the mind will make it happen, even if there is no factual basis for the vitamin or exercise having such a health- and age-altering effect.

So, …. Have a good set of positive, strong beliefs!

The key to health, fitness, and intelligence

September 4, 2017

Over the last 10 years I’ve learned that:

  • Eating one super-healthy meal didn’t give me super health
  • Doing one intense workout didn’t turn me into superman
  • Reading one book that forced me to stretch my mind didn’t turn me into an Einstein.

That said, I’ve discovered that:

  • Eating 10,000 super-healthy meals has given me lots of energy, health, and well-being
  • Doing 1,000 intense workouts has given me strength, endurance, and fitness
  • Reading 500 mind-stretching books has expanded my mental capabilities.

I’ve learned that consistency over the long haul is the key to health, fitness, and intelligence.

Sleep more

August 9, 2017

I heard a few days ago that LeBron James slept 12 hours per day during the NBA playoffs.

I remember in grad school my advisor slept 10 hours per day.

Last week I heard a doctor talk about sleep flushing away plaque in the brain, which is essential for preventing Alzheimer’s.

Recently I increased my sleep from 8 hours per night to 8 ½ hours per night. That has been very helpful. I think that I will increase to 9 hours per night (or more).

Credo to regain the strength and health of my hunter-gatherer ancestors

February 19, 2017

Technology changes rapidly but our biology, our bodies change slowly. Our bodies are essentially the same as 10,000 years ago. 10,000 years ago humans were stronger and healthier. I wish to regain the strength and health of my hunter-gatherer ancestors. To do so, I will emulate their conditions:

  1. I will take a cold shower each day to emulate the environmental extremes that my hunter-gatherer ancestors dealt with.
  2. I will fast on water every Sunday to emulate the periods without food that my hunter-gatherer ancestors endured.
  3. I will go barefoot as much as possible and run my feet over lacrosse balls to emulate the lack of footwear of my hunter-gatherer ancestors.
  4. I will walk outdoors for an hour each day to emulate the long distances that my hunter-gatherer ancestors traveled each day.
  5. I will lift heavy weights to emulate the hard work that my hunter-gatherer ancestors performed each day.
  6. I will eat fresh vegetables, fruits, nuts, seeds, and meat to emulate the diet of my hunter-gatherer ancestors.

The three pillars of health – diet, exercise, and environmental training

January 14, 2017

A few extracts from the (excellent) book: What Doesn’t Kill Us: How Freezing Water, Extreme Altitude, and Environmental Conditioning Will Renew Our Lost Evolutionary Strength by Scott Carney

For at least half a century the conventional wisdom about maintaining good physical health has rested on the twin pillars of diet and exercise. While those are no doubt vital, there’s an equally important, but completely ignored, third pillar – environmental training.

Once you arrive at high altitude, your body automatically produces more red blood cells to compensate for lower oxygen saturation. Move to an oppressively hot environment and your body will sweat out fewer salts over time and produce lower volumes of urine. Heat will also stimulate your cardiovascular system to become more efficient and increase evaporation and cooling. Yet no environmental extreme induces as many changes in human physiology as the cold does.

A plunge into ice-cold water not only triggers a number of processes to warm the body, but also tweaks insulin production, tightens the circulatory system, and heightens mental awareness. A person actually has to get uncomfortable and experience that frigid cold if they want to initiate those systems.

Despite all of our technology, our bodies are just not ready for a world so completely tamed by our desire for comfort. Without stimulation, the responses that were designed to fight environmental challenges don’t always lie dormant. Sometimes they turn inward and wreak havoc on our insides. An entire field of medical research on autoimmune diseases suggests they originate from fundamental disconnect between the outside world and an under stimulated biology.

My journey to consume one gallon of water each day

January 2, 2017

Last November I decided to drink more water. Experts say that you should drink between half an ounce and an ounce of water for each pound you weigh, every day. So for me, I should drink between 8 – 16 cups of water each day. 16 cups = 1 gallon. So I decided to shoot for drinking 16 cups (1 gallon) of water each day. The chart below shows my progress. The worst day was 7 cups, the best day was 14 cups. I learned early on that it’s much easier to consume warm water than cold water, so I warm up each cup that I drink. Lately I have been putting 1 tsp. of baking soda into a cup of water (once or twice daily). I read that that is supposed to be beneficial, although I don’t know how. I still haven’t reached my goal of 16 cups, but I am happy with the progress that I’ve made.

Water Consumption

The health risks of sitting, standing, or treadmilling for long periods

December 19, 2015

We’ve all heard about the perils of sitting for long periods of time. I agree. When I sit for long periods my back hurts and I become stiff. That’s not good.

Many people recommend using a standing desk. I have a standing desk. Standing is a welcome relief from sitting. But after standing for a while I get very stiff. That can’t be good.

Other people recommend walking slowly on a treadmill. I have a treadmill and have done this slow walking. After a month of using the treadmill every day I got deep pains in my hips. I realized that by walking on the treadmill I was working the same set of muscles over and over and over (repetitive stress). Clearly that’s not good.

Sitting for long periods is bad. Standing for long periods is bad. And treadmilling is bad.

What’s the solution? I’ve found the best solution is to change things up frequently: I kneel for 10 minutes, then stand for 10 minutes, then sit for 10 minutes, then get up and walk around for a few minutes. Then repeat.

Looking fit and being fit are not necessarily the same thing

November 15, 2015

In the late 19th century, Dudley Allen Sargent – virtually the founder of physical education in America – warned that without solid physical education programs, people would become fat, deformed, and clumsy.

Fitness has become accessory to the life of the modern man. It is up to each of us to exercise or not. Most people don’t, and being out of shape has become both ubiquitous and commonly accepted. It has become okay to be a physically soft, inept grown-up. Superficial, cosmetic improvements in body shape remains the primary motivation to the few who exercise, and gyms are filled with “mirror-athletes” — people obsessed with their own reflection.

But looking fit and being fit are not necessarily the same. Being fit is being capable of performing physically in the real world with effectiveness and efficiency, and especially when the situation and the environment are challenging.

More … http://www.artofmanliness.com/2013/09/12/a-primer-on-movnat/

Go a whole MONTH without sitting

June 24, 2014

I just read a New York Times article by a fellow who went a whole month without sitting.

After reading the article I’ve decided to give it a go as well. I just moved my chair out of my office so I won’t be tempted to sit.

Will you join me for 30 days of no sitting?

Consider this:

Even if you’re active, even if you get up at five and do your P90X, if you sit six hours a day those benefits are negated.

If you spend more than 11 hours per day in a chair, you’ll increase your risk of dying in the next three years by 40 percent–even if you exercise.

When we sit for long periods of time, the enzymes responsible for burning fat shut down. Sitting too much can lower good cholesterol, HDL, and lead to a slower metabolism. In essence, sitting can cause the disease process.

Here’s the New York Times article: http://nymag.com/health/bestdoctors/2014/sitting-down-2014-6/index1.html