Posts Tagged ‘human evolution’

Unlocking our lost potential

February 12, 2017

From the (fantastic) book What Doesn’t Kill Us by Scott Carney:

Every human alive today lives in a cocoon of consistency: an eternal summer. We’re overlit, overfed, and overstimulated, and in terms of how long we’ve been on Earth, that’s all new.

Humans have evolved with an innate ability to resist the elements. Our remote ancestors marched across endless expanses of frosty mountains and navigated parched deserts long before they invented the most basic footwear or animal-skin coats. While technology has made us more comfortable, the underlying biology is still there. The key to unlocking our lost potential lies in re-creating the sorts of harsh experiences our ancestors would have faced.

If you’ve been wrapped in a thermogenic cocoon for your whole life, then your nervous system is aching for input.

Exposure to cold helps reconfigure the cardiovascular system and combat autoimmune malfunctions.

Humans did not evolve to be inactive

March 27, 2014

Humans evolved to do
a variety of activities,
from low to high intensity.
Most of the time, early
people were resting or
walking long distances,
but sometimes they
had to run or sprint,
climb trees, and throw
things. So a degree of
high-intensity ability was
important in terms of
natural selection. What
we did not evolve to be
is inactive.

Daniel Lieberman,
professor of human
biology at Harvard
University