Posts Tagged ‘movement’

Movement is the holy grail of health

August 13, 2017

Sitting is a disease. Movement is the holy grail of health.

Blood flow is the life force that heals our body and removes the waste. No juice cleanse or apple cider vinegar or lemon water will compensate for inactivity. You don’t need 50 different food items, from 12 different countries, or a rare plant or berry from some remote island or jungle. That’s just another example of our desire to find things that do the work for us, passively. Thinking that we can just eat a superfood and that will make up for inactivity, when we know that regular exercise and maintaining a healthy bodyfat level is the real key to long term health.

I take a brisk 10 minute walk after each meal. Research suggests this improves digestion and reduces blood sugars, much better than a single 30 minute walk daily. Science is telling us that consistency is more important than intensity, and frequency is more important than quantity. Getting up an walking around very hour is better than exercising once at the end of the day.

— Stan Efferding

This is an excellent video by Stan Efferding: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OqjPuhlfO5w&list=PL8JNg3nrHrLTyntHlHg9ng2RchpWGM5zs&index=21

A day of constant movement

January 16, 2016

Think about a stream where the water is constantly flowing. The water is clear and pure. Conversely, a body of water that sits motionless soon becomes stagnant and filthy.

Our bodies are filled with fluids. When we sit — sedentary — for extended periods of time, the fluids in our body become unhealthy, just like a stagnant body of motionless water. Conversely, when we are constantly moving, then the fluids in our body are clear and pure, just like a stream with constantly flowing water.

Tomorrow I am going to do an experiment. I am going to move all day long. I will not sit for even one minute.

 

The health risks of sitting, standing, or treadmilling for long periods

December 19, 2015

We’ve all heard about the perils of sitting for long periods of time. I agree. When I sit for long periods my back hurts and I become stiff. That’s not good.

Many people recommend using a standing desk. I have a standing desk. Standing is a welcome relief from sitting. But after standing for a while I get very stiff. That can’t be good.

Other people recommend walking slowly on a treadmill. I have a treadmill and have done this slow walking. After a month of using the treadmill every day I got deep pains in my hips. I realized that by walking on the treadmill I was working the same set of muscles over and over and over (repetitive stress). Clearly that’s not good.

Sitting for long periods is bad. Standing for long periods is bad. And treadmilling is bad.

What’s the solution? I’ve found the best solution is to change things up frequently: I kneel for 10 minutes, then stand for 10 minutes, then sit for 10 minutes, then get up and walk around for a few minutes. Then repeat.

Looking fit and being fit are not necessarily the same thing

November 15, 2015

In the late 19th century, Dudley Allen Sargent – virtually the founder of physical education in America – warned that without solid physical education programs, people would become fat, deformed, and clumsy.

Fitness has become accessory to the life of the modern man. It is up to each of us to exercise or not. Most people don’t, and being out of shape has become both ubiquitous and commonly accepted. It has become okay to be a physically soft, inept grown-up. Superficial, cosmetic improvements in body shape remains the primary motivation to the few who exercise, and gyms are filled with “mirror-athletes” — people obsessed with their own reflection.

But looking fit and being fit are not necessarily the same. Being fit is being capable of performing physically in the real world with effectiveness and efficiency, and especially when the situation and the environment are challenging.

More … http://www.artofmanliness.com/2013/09/12/a-primer-on-movnat/

We are all visitors, passing through

September 13, 2015

Beautiful quotes from Edwan Le Corre:

Gym-goers think that they are using the machines, not realizing that the machines, by shaping, dictating their movements, are using them.

The removal from nature and from the land is a removal from freedom.

We are all here, on Earth, as visitors, soon to return home

How to be better at your sport

September 29, 2014

Want to get better at your sport?

Then focus on safety!

In order to be safer, you will need to do the movements better. By improving the movements, not only do you improve safety but it will improve the quality of your technique, which will make you better at your sport. Thus, a change in one area (safety) has a cascade of effects on other areas (quality of movement, performance, skill). That is really neat.

I learned this while reading the fantastic book, The Power of Habit. The book talks about the time when Alcoa Corporation was struggling, so they brought in Paul O’Neil as the new CEO. In his inaugural speech to the shareholders O’Neil talked exclusively about safety – his goal was for the company’s workforce to have zero injuries. The shareholders were shell shocked. This was not the normal speech for an incoming CEO. The “normal” CEO would talk about improving profits, streamlining the workforce, etc. But no, O’Neil talked about safety. Over time O’Neil’s focus on safety resulted in a huge impact on the entire corporation, as the only way to improve safety was to do things better (improve quality) and to use reliable machinery (reproducible results). Thus, the focus on safety triggered a cascade of other, positive effects. Under O’Neil’s reign Alcoa’s profits rose five-fold!