Posts Tagged ‘running’

A thousand pound bear can run 50 yards in 3 seconds

October 7, 2017

Last week I was on vacation in Alaska. I learned this:

Never run from a bear: A bear can run 50 yards in 3 seconds, or up to 40 mph, faster than a race horse for short distances, and faster than any human, uphill or downhill.

3 things that I will never recommend

February 29, 2016
  1. I will never recommend a particular diet (paleo, macrobiotic, raw foods, fruitarian, juicing, etc.)
  2. I will never recommend a particular exercise program (weightlifting, running, yoga, etc.)
  3. I will never recommend a particular book.

Why?

Because my views on these things are fluid, constantly changing. Today I am convinced that one diet/exercise program/book is “the ultimate truth” and the next day I realize it’s not. I have no idea what truth is. But I have a pretty good idea what kindness is, so instead of giving my version of truth to people, I will give them my kindness.

Memories of my distant caveman ancestors triggered through running in bare feet

November 22, 2015

For the past 6 months I have been barefoot 90% of time. I wear socks and shoes only when I have to. A remarkable thing has happened during this time. I feel more human than ever. I sense the primal, raw energy of my distant ancestors. I’ve been running barefoot, without shirt, even as the New England temperatures dip. As the cool wind rips across my chest and as my bare feet slap down on the ground with each stride, it triggers deep with me memories of my distant caveman ancestors. Modern day society fades. I am running in the wild. I am chasing my prey (or being chased as prey). Life consists of only the essentials: survive, find food, and build shelter. I am human, again.

Humans did not evolve to be inactive

March 27, 2014

Humans evolved to do
a variety of activities,
from low to high intensity.
Most of the time, early
people were resting or
walking long distances,
but sometimes they
had to run or sprint,
climb trees, and throw
things. So a degree of
high-intensity ability was
important in terms of
natural selection. What
we did not evolve to be
is inactive.

Daniel Lieberman,
professor of human
biology at Harvard
University