Posts Tagged ‘strength’

Credo to regain the strength and health of my hunter-gatherer ancestors

February 19, 2017

Technology changes rapidly but our biology, our bodies change slowly. Our bodies are essentially the same as 10,000 years ago. 10,000 years ago humans were stronger and healthier. I wish to regain the strength and health of my hunter-gatherer ancestors. To do so, I will emulate their conditions:

  1. I will take a cold shower each day to emulate the environmental extremes that my hunter-gatherer ancestors dealt with.
  2. I will fast on water every Sunday to emulate the periods without food that my hunter-gatherer ancestors endured.
  3. I will go barefoot as much as possible and run my feet over lacrosse balls to emulate the lack of footwear of my hunter-gatherer ancestors.
  4. I will walk outdoors for an hour each day to emulate the long distances that my hunter-gatherer ancestors traveled each day.
  5. I will lift heavy weights to emulate the hard work that my hunter-gatherer ancestors performed each day.
  6. I will eat fresh vegetables, fruits, nuts, seeds, and meat to emulate the diet of my hunter-gatherer ancestors.

Super-oxygenate your cells and get stronger with more endurance

January 15, 2017

Before free-divers do a dive they spend time doing deep breathing and quick breathing. The purpose of this breathing is to maximize the amount of oxygen in the cells. The extra oxygen in their system enables them to dive deeper and longer.

In Scott Carney’s new book, he says that ordinarily he can do 20 pushups. While researching his book he attended a workshop where he and the other workshop participants did deep and quick breathing for an hour. At the end of the hour the participants were instructed to do pushups. Carney did 40 pushups – while holding his breath!

Today I figured that I would give this a try. I went for a one hour walk. During the walk I did a lot of deep breathing. After the walk I worked out. My personal best went from 2 reps to 5 reps!

Interesting note in Carney’s book: Controlled hyperventilation will increase oxygen saturation in the blood to 100%, but more significantly, it also expels CO2 which your body uses to gauge when to gasp.