Posts Tagged ‘stress’

Fasting puts a good stress on the body

February 18, 2017

Tomorrow I will fast. I plan to do a one-day fast every Sunday. How about joining me?

For most of human history there were occasions when there was no food. So the human body evolved to survive in times of famine. That’s why we have fat – it is there to carry us over during times of famine.

It’s only in the last 100 years that technology has advanced to the point where food is plentiful and we never have to endure famine. But while technology has changed, our bodies are essentially the same. Our bodies still expect periods without food. There is lots of evidence that when we don’t periodically fast, illnesses ensue. So, periodic fasting is a really good thing. It puts a good stress on the body.

4-minutes to release stress and reset the nervous system

January 29, 2017

Feeling stressed? Here’s how to release the stress. It’s a 4-minute nervous system reset. It restores the acid/alkaline balance in the blood.

Stand up. Shake your arms. Relax. Feel your feet.
Feel your hands and shoulders. Then do 30 deep
breaths. On the last breath, breathe out, hold it,
and then immediately drop down and do
pushups (no breathing).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c7MseR-eDkg

I just did it. I feel great. Amazingly, I did more pushups than I’ve done in years. And they were done without any air in my lungs! Apparently the 30 deep breaths super-oxygenated my cells and it was that which powered me through the pushups. Awesome.

Factors that determine how much of your brain you use

April 23, 2016

I don’t think there is a single solution for maximizing how much of your brain you use. I think it’s a combination of many factors (there are many ways to influence the brain). Here are the key factors (I think) that determine how much of your brain you use:

  1. Exercise: how much exercise? What type of exercise? Frequency of exercise? Variability of exercise? Heavy or light? Endurance or strength? Balancing/coordination? Flexibility? Hormone-stimulating exercises? Walking? Running?
  2. Rest: how much sleep? Naps?
  3. Mental stimulation: reading? Writing? Debate? Games/puzzles?
  4. Food: fresh foods? Cooked or raw? Meat or no meat? Carbs or no carbs? Nutrient-dense? Fasting?
  5. Supplements: caffeine? Supplements that promote the flow of blood to the brain (e.g., Gingko Biloba)? Green tea? Black tea?
  6. Nature: how much time spent in a park? Frequency?
  7. Stress: no stress? Moderate amounts of stress? Massage? Foam roller? Body work?
  8. Music: how much? Classical or other?
  9. Social: lots of socializing? Lots of friends? A few close friends?
  10. Positive attitude: how to keep positive and motivated? Laughter? Smiling?
  11. Goals: short-term goals? Long-term goals?

One thing that I am fairly sure of is this: the body and brain adapt quickly. A strategy that works today for stimulating the brain will likely not work next week or next month. Constant change is crucial. Also, it seems that each human is unique. What works for me may not work for you.

No worry before it’s time

June 1, 2014

Today I listened to a fascinating talk on mindfulness by Dr. Ellen Langer from Harvard University. Here are a few snippets:

Mindfulness is the simple act of actively noticing things.

If you live with somebody, notice five new things about that person. What will happen is the person will start to come alive for you again.

Our experience of everything is formed by the words and ideas we attach to them. Change the words and you will change the experience.

The placebo is a wonderful, wonderful drug. The placebo has cured a lot of people. It’s a very, very powerful medication. The placebo is unlocking your brain’s own pharmacy.

I think yoga is wonderful. I think running is wonderful. Once I decide that I’m going to start running because when I run, I’m going to be healthy, now I’m believing I’m being healthy… and that should translate into greater health. What I’m saying is many of these practices have a large placebo effect.

Events don’t cause stress. What causes stress are the views you take of events. [Epictetus]

Most things are an inconvenience, rather than a tragedy. Let me give you an example. Many years ago, I had a major fire that destroyed 80% of what I owned. And when I called the insurance company, and they came over the next day, the person, the insurance agent, said to me that this was the first call that he’d ever had where the damage was worse than the call. I thought, ‘Well, gee, you know, it’s already taken my stuff. Why give it my soul? You know — why pay twice?’ Which is what people so often do. Something happens, you have that loss, and then you’re going to now throw all your emotional energy at it and so you’re doubling up on the negativity.

I’m against compromise. The reason for that is because it’s an agreement for everybody to lose rather than finding the win/win solution, which is often out there.

You can live to 150 while retaining the energy and vitality of a 40 year old

June 12, 2010

Do you have normal blood pressure? If so, do you reckon, “Since my blood pressure is fine, I can pile on the salt.”

Wrong!

Recent research indicates that salt will damage your heart even if it doesn’t raise your blood pressure (BP):

There is also increasing evidence that a high salt intake may have deleterious effects on the cardiovascular system and lead to the development of cardiac and vascular hypertrophy, independently or in addition to its effect on BP [1]

You can live to 150 while retaining the energy and vitality of a 40 year old. Here’s how:

1. Eliminate salt from your diet.

2. Eliminate refined (white) sugar from your diet.

3. Eliminate refined (white) flour from your diet.

4. Eliminate stress from your life.

5. Exercise daily. (very important)

I learned this from Dr. Oz yesterday.

[1] http://ndt.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/full/22/9/2426