Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

So many different identities … who am I, really?

March 24, 2017

I am a New England Patriot’s football fan.

I am a technology evangelist.

I am Roger.

I am an avid reader.

I am a health buff.

So many different identities.

Are they who I am?

It’s fascinating how my mind (ego) defines itself by creating these various identities.

Imagine the chaos that would ensue within my mind if I could disassociate from all those identities. I have been told that the real me would emerge.

Food chemists … TV writer chemists?

March 17, 2017

Several years ago, someone wrote a book describing food chemists. Apparently, people in the food industry have discovered a certain combination of fats, salt, and sugar that makes people want to eat more and more. Good for the food industry. Bad for consumers.

It occurs to me that an analogous thing has happened with TV writing. There are some shows on TV that hit me with a huge emotional punch. After an episode is over my adrenaline is racing, the show runs through my mind over and over, and I have a hard time sleeping. And, …. I can’t wait to see the next episode! Good for the TV industry. Perhaps not so good for TV viewers.

Have TV writers discovered a way to write which causes viewers to crave more and more?

I spoke with a colleague about this and she referred me to these books and TED talk:

Made to Stick

Thinking Fast and Slow

Rory Sutherland

The greatest two lessons that I’ve learned

March 7, 2017
  1. Nothing that I do is important.
  2. My thoughts are not important.

Washing dishes is no less (and no more) important than anything else. So, I may as well treat everything with equal presence – give the same presence to washing dishes as to driving a car on an icy road.

Since my thoughts are not important, I no longer need to be consumed in my thoughts and emotions. I am free to simply observe (witness) my thoughts and emotions without condemnation.

These “lessons” at first seemed shocking to me, but on further reflection they are liberating.

Consciousness is the Universe looking at itself

March 4, 2017

The Universe is experiencing itself, for a brief moment, as a human being. It’s also experiencing itself, for a brief moment, as plants and animals. The Universe chooses, through you, to be conscious.
– Eckhart Tolle

Stop labeling everything

March 1, 2017

“It’s cold outside.”

“There is a bad pain in my lower back.”

No.

It’s not cold outside. “cold” is a label. There isn’t cold weather or warm weather. It just is.

There isn’t a bad pain in my lower back. The body just contains senses. “bad pain” is a label given to a sensation.

The problem with labeling everything is that there is an overwhelming temptation to turn life into a mental exercise rather than actually experiencing life — feeling and living the sensations and feelings.

What happens when we die?

March 1, 2017

Person: What happens when we die?

Eckhart Tolle: I haven’t gone through physical death yet. But I have gone very deeply, to what one could call death to identification with form [death to identification with the body, the mind, and the emotions]. So in a way, I have gone into that realm from where I can say and know that ultimately what we see as death is dissolution of form. The eternal in us, I know firsthand, cannot be touched by that [by dissolution of form].

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BEUxg2GEivU

Every moment is fresh and new

February 28, 2017

I have observed this within myself: when something happens during the day, I react in the same way that I have in the past. It’s like a tape recorder inside me that keeps playing over and over. That’s not an interesting life, when nothing is new.

Eckhart Tolle talks about being present in every moment. When something happens during the day, you face it head-on, without thoughts or emotions of the past or anxieties of the future. In this way, every moment is fresh and new. Each day is full of life!

Credo to regain the strength and health of my hunter-gatherer ancestors

February 19, 2017

Technology changes rapidly but our biology, our bodies change slowly. Our bodies are essentially the same as 10,000 years ago. 10,000 years ago humans were stronger and healthier. I wish to regain the strength and health of my hunter-gatherer ancestors. To do so, I will emulate their conditions:

  1. I will take a cold shower each day to emulate the environmental extremes that my hunter-gatherer ancestors dealt with.
  2. I will fast on water every Sunday to emulate the periods without food that my hunter-gatherer ancestors endured.
  3. I will go barefoot as much as possible and run my feet over lacrosse balls to emulate the lack of footwear of my hunter-gatherer ancestors.
  4. I will walk outdoors for an hour each day to emulate the long distances that my hunter-gatherer ancestors traveled each day.
  5. I will lift heavy weights to emulate the hard work that my hunter-gatherer ancestors performed each day.
  6. I will eat fresh vegetables, fruits, nuts, seeds, and meat to emulate the diet of my hunter-gatherer ancestors.

Fasting puts a good stress on the body

February 18, 2017

Tomorrow I will fast. I plan to do a one-day fast every Sunday. How about joining me?

For most of human history there were occasions when there was no food. So the human body evolved to survive in times of famine. That’s why we have fat – it is there to carry us over during times of famine.

It’s only in the last 100 years that technology has advanced to the point where food is plentiful and we never have to endure famine. But while technology has changed, our bodies are essentially the same. Our bodies still expect periods without food. There is lots of evidence that when we don’t periodically fast, illnesses ensue. So, periodic fasting is a really good thing. It puts a good stress on the body.

Unlocking our lost potential

February 12, 2017

From the (fantastic) book What Doesn’t Kill Us by Scott Carney:

Every human alive today lives in a cocoon of consistency: an eternal summer. We’re overlit, overfed, and overstimulated, and in terms of how long we’ve been on Earth, that’s all new.

Humans have evolved with an innate ability to resist the elements. Our remote ancestors marched across endless expanses of frosty mountains and navigated parched deserts long before they invented the most basic footwear or animal-skin coats. While technology has made us more comfortable, the underlying biology is still there. The key to unlocking our lost potential lies in re-creating the sorts of harsh experiences our ancestors would have faced.

If you’ve been wrapped in a thermogenic cocoon for your whole life, then your nervous system is aching for input.

Exposure to cold helps reconfigure the cardiovascular system and combat autoimmune malfunctions.